Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Posts tagged “Water movement

More at Kilcarnup

These were from the same shoot as the last one.
Kilcarnup storm
Kilcarnup smoothie!
In this second image the water flows very fast into this little bay. If you drop something in there it is gone forever!
Another exampleHere is another example.
The stormy setting made for some interesting images – enjoyable until the rain came.


Wyadup (some photographic fun)

A D800E, Lee Big Stopper and lots of water movement. A good recipe. The first image is interesting – the beach changes almost daily in this area. A week ago you could walk almost up the middle of this image. Soon this will all be deep water, and will remain that way until next summer when the buildup of sand will begin again.

Shifting sands at Wyadup

Shifting sands at Wyadup


This next image is of a large V – Shaped gap which channels the waves forcing them into the V with increasing force. This is definitely not a place to swim, and is a dangerous place to fish from.
The Gap

The Gap


And finally this is where the water forced up into the gap winds up. Occasionally I have seen people swimming here and when the water surges in from the gap, they stand under it like standing under a waterfall.
The waterfall

The waterfall


Wyadup

There is this place where the waves are channelled into a V – shaped gap. The water blasts over the rocks at the end of the gap, and falls into a shallow canal which takes the water away. On quiet days the water doesn’t get over the rocks at the end of the gap. When it does it is a great place to practice slow exposures.

Wyadup

Wyadup


Canal Rocks Boat ramp and jetty

The Quindalup jetty has been attracting the attention of photographers over recent years. In the 2011 Epson International Pano Awards, 4 images of the top 50 Nature Amateur and the top 50 Nature Professional results were images of the Cape to Cape region of Western Australia (ie they were from my backyard). 2 of these images were of the Quindalup Jetty. No other structure  worldwide was so well awarded! Nor was any other region.

I have even posted a few images of the Quindalup jetty myself. However the Quindalup jetty has a lesser known brother – the Canal Rocks jetty. In rough weather (pretty common on this relatively unprotected coast) I doubt the boat ramp is much good for launching boats (would you back your car into this?), but it does offer some good opportunities for photographers. It works because the ramp on the left is higher than the ramp on the right, so you get these patterns of water flow as the waves spill from the top ramp to the bottom.

Just watch out for the unexpected big wave.

Canal Rocks boat ramp

Canal Rocks boat ramp


More Bunker Bay

Lately the weather down here has been absolutely perfect – for everything except photography. Not a cloud in sight anywhere. That was why I went out to Bunker Bay to capture the early sunlight on the cliffs. I couldn’t think of anything better. While I was waiting for the sun to rise I played around with this shot – similar to yesterdays but showing the folding patterns in the rock.

Folded rock at Bunker Bay

Folded rock at Bunker Bay


Bunker Bay

I went out to Bunker Bay this morning to take some photos of the early morning sun on the limestone cliffs and sea caves. While I was waiting for the sun to appear I took this shot. (I am still processing the shot of the cliffs and caves).

Bunker Bay water movement

Bunker Bay water movement


Canal Rocks under a full moon

Canal Rocks is a great place to take pictures under a full moon. Just after moonrise the east side of the canal is in shadow, and some light painting necessary (or just wait until the moon rises!). Long exposures  graphically illustrate the  movement of water through the canal.

Canal Rocks under full moon

Canal Rocks at night

Canal Rocks at night

Canal Rocks under full moon