Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Posts tagged “Sugarloaf Rocks

Will it, won’t it?

Back home in the South West of WA. Last night I went out to Sugarloaf Rocks as there was some cloud around, and it even looked like there may be a thunderstorm. When I arrived there was a large band of cloud above the horizon, and the sun was disappearing behind it. It didn’t look promising, and some photographers left. I noticed a clear band just above the horizon and stayed to see if the sun would make a final appearance. It did and the sunset was quite spectacular.

Sugarloaf sunset

Sugarloaf sunset


Sugarloaf Rocks

On Sunday morning I got a call from Mark Stothard. He was at Sugarloaf Rocks and wanted to know if I wanted to join him in a shoot. I think he was really looking for someone to watch out and rescue him if he got washed in! (See his recent post, although he wasn’t in any danger when he got wet). As I had just got a new Nikon D7000 the day before, I was out there before you could say “ISO6400 wow”! There are a few differences with my old D90, and I had a bit of learning to do. This is my first panorama from the D7000. It was a bit tricky because of the waves.

Stormy Sugarloaf

Stormy Sugarloaf


So far I am very pleased with the D7000. Focussing while zoomed-in in Liveview wasn’t possible with the D90, so at times especially in low light it was hard to focus accurately. The low light capability of the D7000 is a leap ahead from the D90, and it has better mirror up functions, an intervalometer, slightly more megapixels and much more.


Sugarloaf Rocks sunset

This is the classical Sugarloaf Rocks shot. The majority of the action in the sky occurred after most photographers had left. There were three of us – the other two were a husband and wife pair. The wife was the photographer whereas the husband only had a PS camera. He wanted to leave but I convinced them to stay on. Just then her batteries ran out and the husband got the best image of the night.

I liked this so much I have used it as the front page of a book I am preparing on the scenery of the Cape to Cape walking trail.

This was a 30 second exposure at f22.


Sugarloaf Rocks

Sugarloaf Rocks

Sugarloaf Rocks sunset

This image obtained a bronze award in the recent Landscape 500 competition, and also in the 2011 Epson International Pano awards.  It is two rows of about 7 images (I forget exactly how many) all stitched to produce a composite panorama. Each individual image was a fused exposure of around 6-9 different exposures. This technique allows the rich colors of the setting sun to be retained.

The seagulls were included to give a sense of life, and depth to the image. I arrived at Sugarloaf early and set up the camera to take the individual images for the panorama. I began feeding the seagulls, and without adjusting the focal length of the lens, refocussed and began taking the photos of the seagulls. The best of the images were selected and placed over the panorama in exactly the correct position. The background around the seagulls was masked leaving the seagull in exactly the position it was when captured.

I am pleased with this image. It is a view of Sugarloaf you do not see often – taken from out the front looking back to the coast. Of all the prints I have made of my images this one receives the most favorable comments.