Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Posts tagged “dunes

Pinnacles

On the way back from the wheat belt I drove along the Indian Ocean Drive and went past Cervantes. I called in to the Pinnacles and stayed until well after the sun set below the horizon. The moon had risen in the east by that time and although there were no clouds to make a classic sunset, the red glow in the sky made up for it.

Pinnacles

Pinnacles

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Patterns

The classical photos of sand dunes have wind blown ripples in the sand. At Yeagarup at the moment the sand is too wet and any ripples are quite small. However when it rains heavily the water runs down the slopes washing sand down. When the sand dries, the sand that was washed down is loose and dries more rapidly than the underlying sand. This creates bands of light and dark that follow the contours. This photo is a good example. You can also see the small wind blown ripples in the sand on the left. Someone had lit a fire in the background – hence the smoke.

Patterns in the sand

Patterns in the sand


I would expect that later in the year the sand would have dried out and the wind blown ripples of sand would return.


Yeagarup Dunes sunrise

This image gives a wider perspective of the dunes.

Yeagarup sunrise

Yeagarup sunrise


By the way – the sand cliff in the distant middle of this shot is the same cliff as the image in the previous post!


Yeagarup Dunes

The main reason I went to Pemberton was to take some photos on the Yeagarup dunes. This is a massive system of sand dunes near the coast. I came to the conclusion that sunrise is the best time to photograph the dunes because the “cliffs” like you see in this photo all face east.

Yeagarup Dunes

Yeagarup Dunes


I like this because it is simple and abstract.

More to come over the next few days.


Injidup

Injidup dawn

Injidup Beach from Cape Clairault sand dunes

This image was taken from the sand dunes at Cape Clairault, looking back towards Injidup Beach. The trees were lit with flash. It is a single row stitch of 5 images. Each image was a blended image from a series of photos taken at different exposures. This technique allows me to extract the maximum amount of the color of the early morning skies.

 

This image received a bronze award in the 2010 Landscape 500 competition.