Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Archive for August, 2012

Gunyidi-Wubin Rd – sunrise in lake

I have just completed a 3 day tour around the West Australian Wildflower regions. Day 1 was raining, and I got an early start on Day 2, leaving Watheroo. I wanted to catch a sunrise at a nice location, but was not hopeful as it was dark and I didn’t know the area. At the last moment I saw a white area to the side and stopped. I found a salt lake with water in it. There was fog all around,and I put fog, water,lake,sunrise together – it made for a good photo. One small problem – salt lakes in western Australia usually have lots of mud, and this was no exception, Fortunately I had a pair of gum boots in the car and with them on I was able to walk out in the lake and wait for the sunrise. This is the result – straight out of the camera – all I have done is stitch the image. Now all I have to do is get the mud off the gum boots!

Gunyidi - Wubin Rd Sunrise

Gunyidi – Wubin Rd Sunrise


Sunset at Yallingup

This was taken on Saturday evening – a glorious winter day with temperatures around 24c.

Yallingup sunset

Yallingup sunset


After I had finished photographing the sunset I turned around and found a large crowd watching (the sunset – not me). This place seems to be a popular place to watch the sunset. I have previously sold a print of a sunset taken from this spot to someone from Brisbane who wanted it as an engagement present for a friend. Apparently the friend proposed to his girlfriend on this spot while watching the sun set!


Windy Harbour

While I was in Pemberton I went down to Windy Harbour for a look. I have never been there (it is not exactly on the road to anywhere) and was pleasantly surprised. It is full of “fishing shacks” many of which are brightly painted (and some which need to be!). The whole town was very neat and tidy – I didn’t see any unkempt gardens for example and all lawn areas were neatly mown. It would be interesting to photograph the town during a long weekend when there were more people around. Here are some images from Windy Harbour (the name gives a good idea of what the dominant weather is – there is nothing between Windy Harbour and Antartica!

Windy Harbour shack

Windy Harbour shack

Windy Harbour Street

I should have taken more shots like this to convey the feel of the place.

Murals

This toilet block gives a good indication of the major interest of the locals. There are pictures of many of the local fish species painted on the wall.

This is a tractor!

There seems to be work going on at the boat ramp, but I think many people launch their boats from the beach. I don’t think this one will have any problems with soft sand!

Paint me!

The paint may be peeling but the lawns are well kept.

Yellow Weekender

Mellow Yellow?


Moons Crossing

These shots were taken upstream of Moon’s Crossing (the crossing refers to an old road crossing now in poor condition and only navigable by vehicles with good ground clearance and when the river levels are low). Upstream there are large pools and the river runs at a direction that allows the early morning sun to light the river – very nice in an early morning fog!).

Moon Crossing tranquility.

Moon Crossing tranquility.

Morning fog

Morning fog


Karri Tree

You can’t go to Pemberton and not take a photo of a Karri Tree. These are the third largest trees in the world behind the Californian redwood and the Victorian Mountain Ash (according to the tour guide). The oldest ones are around 300 years old. You can tell the oldest ones (apart from size) because the crowns have collapsed. Many of these old trees have this cavity in the base – good habitat for something! Around Pemberton these old trees seem to have this bright green moss around the base. In this shot the fern gives some appreciation of the size – this tree would have been over 2m in diameter.

Karri in old growth forest

Karri in old growth forest


Patterns

The classical photos of sand dunes have wind blown ripples in the sand. At Yeagarup at the moment the sand is too wet and any ripples are quite small. However when it rains heavily the water runs down the slopes washing sand down. When the sand dries, the sand that was washed down is loose and dries more rapidly than the underlying sand. This creates bands of light and dark that follow the contours. This photo is a good example. You can also see the small wind blown ripples in the sand on the left. Someone had lit a fire in the background – hence the smoke.

Patterns in the sand

Patterns in the sand


I would expect that later in the year the sand would have dried out and the wind blown ripples of sand would return.


Yeagarup Dunes sunrise

This image gives a wider perspective of the dunes.

Yeagarup sunrise

Yeagarup sunrise


By the way – the sand cliff in the distant middle of this shot is the same cliff as the image in the previous post!