Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Archive for November, 2011

Street Photography

While on a brief visit to Perth I went to the CBD to get a replacement UV filter that got damaged when my tripod fell over. I was wandering around the CBD, and went down a lane between Murray and Hay St. I came across this guy scrubbing a restaurants pots and pans in this alcove off the lane. I was standing in the lane when I took the photo. He agreed to let me take his picture. I wonder if the people eating in the restaurant would have kept their appetite if they knew that this was where the restaurants pots and pans were cleaned!

The Scrubbery

The Scrubbery

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Sugarloaf at night

I mentioned earlier I was still processing shots from Sugarloaf. I waited until the stars came out, (and the lighthouse!) and took a series of shots while painting the scene with a torch. I learnt a few things – such as it doesn’t really work well when there is a lot of spray around, and that you have to wait until it gets really dark (especially when the rocks you are lighting are a long way off).

Night time at Sugarloaf

Night time at Sugarloaf


This makes an interesting contrast to the shot I posted earlier from the same location (different lens). That shot was taken just after sunset.


Sugarloaf Rocks

Last night the sky was looking promising for a spectacular sunset, so I went down to Sugarloaf Rock to watch it, and try for a night time shot with stars (still processing that one). I like to get out on the front looking back. It was a great night, made even better by the sight of a seal, two dolphins, and a pod of whales breaching offshore. For a while it seemed I had missed the sunset – behind me it was going wild. However eventually I started to get this pink glow in the clouds just after sunset. This was a lot more subdued than the sky looking directly at the sunset, but was still a lovely color.

Sugarloaf Rock

Sugarloaf Rock


Wellington Dam

I went over to Collie today and dropped in at the Wellington Dam. This dam was built during the depression and in the 1960’s supplied water to places like Narrogin (I drank a lot of Wellington Dam water). However due to catchment clearing the dam became saline and unfit for drinking. A new dam (Harris Dam) has replaced the Wellington and this dam is mostly used for recreational purposes. I understand that there is a long term aim to reduce salinity in Wellington dam, but with all Western Australian dams showing declining yields this may never happen (ie by the time it happens there may not be enough water in the dam to make it worthwhile).

Wellington Dam 1

Wellington Dam 1


Wellington Dam 2

Wellington Dam 2


The water is being discharged from the dam to get rid of the most saline water. This is intended to reduce the overall salinity of the water in the dam and eventually return the dam as a potable source. Doesn’t seem likely after 40 years of trying.


Boranup Forest

While we were in the forest the cloud cover was being burnt off and the light became very harsh. However this shot just scraped in. It seems to break a few rules (the eye is lead to several different places for example). However I think it works and it provides a different perspective of the karri tree in the centre. I originally suggested to Mark that we try Boranup because with the cherry picker we could avoid the “looking up” shots of the giant trees and this worked well.

Which way?

Which way?


Birds eye view of Boranup forest

Here is a shot taken from the cherry picker in Boranup forest. From the ground you cant see through the forest like this because you are stuck in the undergrowth that you see the top of here. At this point the sky was cloudy and the light was beautiful, very soft. Soon after this the sun burnt off the clouds and the light became very harsh – very contrasty, and the results were not as good.

Boranup Forest

Boranup Forest


Taking Photography to a whole new level

Mark Stothard was (is) in Dunsborough this weekend to do some commercial shoots. For these shoots he needed to hire a cherry picker and he asked me to help out. It turns out it is really a two man operation anyway – partly for safety reasons, but also logistical. However this meant we had a new toy to try out for the weekend, and we gave it a pretty full workout, exhausting the batteries and ourselves over a 15 hour stretch. It was great fun and the cherry picker certainly gives a fresh perspective to shots of places that have been extensively photographed. (Many passers by commented on our super tripod!). I will post some shots later when I have them stitched, but here is a shot of Mark in action.

Super tripod

Super tripod