Landscape Photographer from the South West of Western Australia

Archive for October, 2011

Wyadup night sky

This is the shot I went down to Wyadup to take when I saw the whales playing. I went down at sunset so I could get to this vantage point before it was dark.

Wyadup night sky

Wyadup night sky


Whale playtime

I went down to Wyadup this evening to try for a shot with the stars in the sky. However when I got there there were about 20 whales going past. They appeared to be a lot of humpback calves and a few mums. The calves were having fun practising breaching. (I will post the result of the star shots later).

Wyadup Whales

Wyadup Whales


These are magnificent creatures. When I went to school in this area we never saw whales. They were killed before they got past Albany. Eventually whaling ceased, but only when the estimated number of whales (probably humpbacks) left was less than the whaling company’s annual catch. In other words if they hadn’t stopped then they probably would have within a couple of months due to lack of whales. It is fantastic to be able to see the numbers increasing each year, and just to be able to go down to the coast and see sights like this. I hope they never again get hunted to the brink of extinction.


Abandoned carriages

I came across these railway carriages in Bunbury that don’t seem to have moved for years. The graffiti artists obviously appreciate the space, and have done a pretty good job on them.

Bunbury rail carriages

Bunbury rail carriages


Bunbury Harbour

I was in Bunbury today and took this shot of the harbour. The major export seems to be woodchips, and the harbour is screened off from view at ground level. However from several vantage points you can get a reasonable view of the harbour and this was taken from the lookout near the high school. I like the contrast in colors the woodchips give, and the industrial look to the whole scene.

Bunbury harbour

Bunbury harbour


Osprey mother and child

I went down to Kilcarnup again today to get a shot of the Osprey chick in the nest before it grew up and left. They grow very quickly and in a few weeks they are nearly full size. Last time I was there the chick was only just tall enough to peek above the rim of the nest, but today it had grown a lot. It was still happy to hide behind mum when I appeared and I had to wait to get the shot.

Osprey chick

Osprey chick


When I have been there previously I noticed mum seems to get “cabin fever” about every hour and takes off for a quick flight. This time she was checking me out and with the strong sea breeze was able to hover directly above me – a bit scary because Osprey’s have formidable beaks and claws. I was lying on my back to get this shot – partly because I wanted to keep an eye on her! The nest is on a small limestone outcrop which is a small island, so they feel pretty sure that I can’t get to the nest. I am sure she just wanted to stretch her wings and to give me the message that I was to stay away.
Osprey mother

Osprey mother


Wonnerup House

We took our grandkids out to Wonnerup House when they visited in the school holidays. This building was built in 1859 after the earlier home burnt down. This building is one of the few in the area open to the public from that era. (Ellenbrook Homestead is another).

Wonnerup House

Wonnerup House


This next shot is of one of the rooms. The National Trust have set up each room with furniture and other accessories from the original era so that you can see how the early settlers lived.
Wonnerup house room

Wonnerup house room


Brisbane sign

I saw this sign in Brisbane.

Silly sign